Fines and time penalties Tour de France 2024 | Despite the grueling stage 17, nobody has to open their wallet Cycling
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Fines and time penalties Tour de France 2024 | Despite the grueling stage 17, nobody has to open their wallet

Fines and time penalties Tour de France 2024 | Despite the grueling stage 17, nobody has to open their wallet

Throwing away waste, prohibited positions on the bike, sticky bottles, or a shoulder push in the lead-up to a bunch sprint; all sorts of things can happen during a race, especially in the Tour de France, which has 21 stages. IDLProCycling.com tracks the various infractions and associated penalties for you in this overview!

A rider can be penalized by the jury for various reasons. A common reason is the improper disposal of food and bottles. There are designated zones for this on the course. If a rider throws away their waste outside these zones, they (or the responsible team director) can be fined for it.

Fines are also frequently issued for sticky bottles. This occurs when a rider saves their legs by allowing themselves to be pulled along by the team car while receiving a bottle. Nowadays, riders also need to be mindful of their posture on the bike. Positions such as the time-trial stance (wrists over the center of the handlebars) during a stage and the ‘super-tuck’ (sitting on the top tube during a descent) have been prohibited by the jury for several years now, with the UCI being responsible for this.

Fines are not the only penalties the jury can impose. They can also issue time penalties or deduct points from secondary classifications like the points classification or the mountain jersey. Additionally, a rider’s UCI ranking points are not safe in the case of serious or repeated infractions. The more severe the infraction, or the more frequently it occurs in a stage, the heavier the penalty. The ultimate penalty is disqualification, although this is rarely enforced.

Fines and time penalties Tour de France 2024

Stage 17

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 16

A bizarre incident in the final phase of the sixteenth stage of the Tour resulted in a fine for Johannes Kulset from Uno-X. The Norwegian crashed in the final phase and tried to return behind a car, but he misjudged a roundabout and nearly hit another team car from his squad. For "using the slipstream of a vehicle," Kulset received a fine of 200 Swiss francs, a deduction of 15 UCI points, a thirty-second time penalty, and a deduction of 10 points in the points classification.

Stage 14

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 13

On day thirteen, we saw another crash and therefore another penalty. This time, Maxim Van Gils could not escape the jury's judgment after making contact with Amaury Capiot during the sprint. The Belgian received a fine of 1,500 Swiss francs and a deduction of 60 UCI points.

That wasn't all, as the jury report also penalized Dylan Groenewegen and Luke Durbridge of Jayco-AlUla for discarding waste outside the designated zones. The familiar penalty: a fine of 500 francs and a deduction of 25 UCI points.

Stage 12

Chaos reigned in the twelfth stage of the Tour. A massive crash knocked Primoz Roglic out of the general classification, and the sprint finish was equally tumultuous. Arnaud Démare and Mark Cavendish were penalized by the jury for irregular actions during the sprint. The jury cited "deviation from the chosen line, endangering others."

Démare and Cavendish were relegated, losing their third and fifth places, respectively. They were each fined 500 Swiss francs and docked 13 points in the points classification. Astana Qazaqstan, Cavendish's team, strongly disagreed with the decision. "We are very disappointed because we believe Mark sprinted fairly. He is very upset and angry," said Mark Renshaw in a statement. "The fact that Daniel McLay, Démare's lead-out, completely stopped pedaling after his job is more deserving of a penalty. Mark had to go around him on the left."

Egan Bernal, representing INEOS Grenadiers, was fined 200 francs by the jury for urinating in an unauthorized area.

Stage 11

The jury had to intervene on day eleven when it came to Decathlon AG2R La Mondiale. In a blisteringly fast and long stage, team leader Felix Gall accepted some food within the last twenty kilometers, which was not allowed. The Swiss rider received a 20-second penalty in the general classification, 6 penalty points in the points classification, and a fine of 500 Swiss francs. Team leader Julien Jurdie was fined 1000 francs.

Romain Bardet managed to finish the stage without a penalty in the jury report. The Frenchman riding for Team dsm-firmenich PostNL took his sweet time to thank his fan club as he rode past them. While Julien Bernard was fined for a similar action on day seven, Bardet was not reprimanded. And rightly so!

Stage 10

Two team managers were held responsible for littering in an unauthorized area by an unidentified rider. Rolf Aldag (Red Bull-BORA-hansgrohe) and Gabriel Rasch (Uno-X) were fined 500 Swiss francs each as the head team managers.

Stage 9

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 8

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 7

Anyone who expected the jury to have little to do during a time trial was mistaken. The jury handed out some very notable fines. Stage two winner Kévin Vauquelin (Arké-B&B Hotels) crossed the line significantly. He received a fine of 500 Swiss francs and a deduction of 20 UCI points for "attacks, intimidation, insults, threats and improper behavior (including pulling on another rider's jersey or saddle, hitting with a helmet, knee, elbow, shoulder, foot, or hand, etc.) that is indecent or that endangers others."

Then there's local hero Julien Bernard (Lidl-Trek), who turned the time trial over his home roads into a real celebration. In particular on the climb, he whipped up the crowd. At one point, he even stopped to greet his family or fan club. The jury, however, did not appreciate this. Bernard received a fine of 200 Swiss francs for inappropriate behavior during the time trial and for damaging the reputation of the sport. Finally, there was a fine of 200 Swiss francs for Valentin Madouas (Groupama-FDJ) for riding too close to another rider's wheel.

Stage 6

In the sixth stage to Dijon, one event took center stage: the disqualification of Jasper Philipsen after he hindered Wout van Aert in a full sprint. For this, he was also docked thirteen points in the fight for green, as well as fined 500 Swiss francs.

Philipsen was not the only one penalized. Mark Cavendish, Thursday's stage winner, was also fined. The Brit was penalized for drafting behind a car and had to pay 200 Swiss francs, with an additional ten-point penalty in the points classification. Teammate Alexey Lutsenko faced the same fate, while team directors Dmitriy Fofonov (Astana) and Mario Aerts (Lotto-Dstny) received fines of 500 Swiss francs each.

Stage 5

The tumultuous stage to Saint-Vulbas leads to infractions for the first time in three days. Phil Bauhaus deviated from his line in the sprint, resulting in a 13-point penalty in the points classification and a fine of 500 Swiss francs. Jarrad Drizners was fined 200 francs for 'inappropriate behavior at the finish.' Davide Ballerini faced the same penalty, also for actions after the finish.

Stage 4

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 3

No fines or time penalties.

Stage 2

On day two, the first fines were handed out. Two of them went to Alpecin-Deceuninck team managers. Team manager Christoph Roodhooft received a fine of 500 Swiss francs for violating rules regarding vehicle movements during the race. His colleague Gianni Meersman failed to comply with the commissioners' instructions, resulting in a fine of 200 Swiss francs.

Arkéa-B&B Hotels, despite showcasing its positive side with stage winner Kévin Vauquelin, also had some issues. His teammate Raul Garcia Pierna was penalized for urinating in public. This infraction cost the Spanish all-rounder (or his team) 200 Swiss francs. Lastly, 44 bikes were inspected for mechanical fraud, with no violations found.

Stage 1

The jury will have looked back on the first Tour with satisfaction. They did not have to hand out any penalties, an exemplary start for a so far well behaved peloton. 24 bikes were selected for a check for mechanical fraud. No irregularities were found.

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